40% Moly grease for OEM trigger mechanism-Big difference!
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  1. #1
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    40% Moly grease for OEM trigger mechanism-Big difference!

    I know many of you have Timey or some other aftermarket triggers on your rifles. However, if you want to feel how much better you OEM trigger can be for cheap,ask one of your friends that does their own maintenance on their Gold Wing or BMW M/C rear drive hubs. Ask for a small dab (bring a small jar) .Use this 40% moly on a tooth pick and put some on the sear(small hole on side of Rem trigger mechanism). Any Moly grease you buy from auto store is only 2-3% moly-so the concentrated stuff is like magic. You can tell the factory put a tiny bit of (dry) moly at/on the sear, but it is well dried out (mine was). I have an 8oz container -so I have more than a lifetime supply. I used this on other rifles like the accutriggers on Savage, mossburg and it make the trigger feel like you lightened it, just by putting some of this on.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Winxp_Man's Avatar
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    I would not keep oil or grease in a XMP trigger period. I mean thinking about it all the dirt that would gather in the trigger system. Then it might be prone to issues. Just my opinion.
    shoot to kill not wound !

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  3. #3
    Senior Member Deadshot2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Winxp_Man View Post
    I would not keep oil or grease in a XMP trigger period. I mean thinking about it all the dirt that would gather in the trigger system. Then it might be prone to issues. Just my opinion.
    I second the NO LUBE on a trigger assy. There's no quicker way to gum up a trigger than to put anything sticky in it that will attract dust, dirt, etc. If you have a trigger assy that needs to have lube on it to work properly you need a new trigger assy.

    Putting lipstick on a pig still leaves you with a pig.


    Rather than add "preperation-H" to a trigger, why not try cleaning it out either with a good flushing and blow-out or in an ultrasonic cleaner. You'd be amazed at how much better a clean trigger will feel, that is unless the sear was finished with 100 grit sandpaper

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  5. #4
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    Brand new Rem SPS. They put (very small amount) of moly in there from the factory-you could see it. The stuff I use is probably the same-though more % of moly. It too will have the carrier dry up and just leave the moly behind-Its supposed to be that way-dry after a while. A minute amount. I have been doing this for over 45 yrs. No problem as of yet. In my 270 I have been in as low as 3 below with it and trigger worked fine. I typically don't grovel in the dirt-so I guess I never have accumulated enough dirt to see any issues there. Typically hunting/varmit rifles triggers/bolts,get the through de-grease every 5-7yrs. I will probably shoot this SPS at paper one more-so it may get the treatment every 2 yrs. My 45's get completely cleaned down to the frame every other time out. BTW I am a big believer in small amount of high temp grease on the bolt lugs. Agree with lipstick on a pig-still a pig. I guess you are comparing the stock trigger to a pig. I actually have experience with Timey and Jewel. As far as I am concerned the stock trigger (If you dry fire it a few hundred times) is really a pretty good trigger IMO.

  6. #5
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    BTW anything metal to metal needs some kind of lube-however small. Even though the sear and trigger parts are of hardened steel-sooner or later they can gauld/wear from movement. I don't remember any of the trigger Mgf. suggesting running dry, unless I missed something. Militec lube is a (wet with carrier, then dries)- weapons lubricant that is used in Iraq. It consists of a powdered chemical (something di-sulfide) that is slipperier than moly. It adheares to the metal with heat and or friction. But if you want to run dry -to each their own.

  7. #6
    Senior Member Deadshot2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kawzak View Post
    BTW anything metal to metal needs some kind of lube-however small. Even though the sear and trigger parts are of hardened steel-sooner or later they can gauld/wear from movement. I don't remember any of the trigger Mgf. suggesting running dry, unless I missed something. Militec lube is a (wet with carrier, then dries)- weapons lubricant that is used in Iraq. It consists of a powdered chemical (something di-sulfide) that is slipperier than moly. It adheares to the metal with heat and or friction. But if you want to run dry -to each their own.

    Give a call to Timney and they'll clue you in on lube and triggers. They've been building triggers probably as long as you and I have been shooting.

    As to all metals needing lube, that's an old wives tale. When you get into super hard metals like the various tool steels used in trigger parts it's unnecessary. First of all, the movement is only a small amount and pressures are extremely low. No need for any lube which has only three purposes. To Separate, Cool, or Seal. The metal is hard and won't gall. There is no heat, and seal? From what? You have to remember, not everything that exists in the world of machinery transfers to the world of firearms. I've lived in both worlds for well over 60 years both as a hobbyist and professional.

    If it makes you feel better go ahead. Just be prepared to clean.

    As for Military and weapons lube, they ahve a whole different set of operating parameters. First of all, MOST of the weapons that require lube like we're speaking of are "burst fire" or "full auto". Whole different world.

    As for the "Dry Lube" all us GI's during the Vietnam "conflict" used a product called Dri-Slide which was popular among off road motorcycle riders. It was Molybdenum Di-Sulphide in an evaporating carrier. It helped keep M-16's running. Today the secret in Basic Training units is to just squirt a bunch of CLP into an open ejection port before any firing exercise.

    Since we're mainly talking Reminton 700's here, a nice clean and dry trigger assy will work far better than a gummed up one filled with lube.

  8. #7
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    Like you said to each their own. I don't remember saying the lube sealed anything though. I am used to working with Hi psi dies and components. I have designed many parts that I have treated to 60Rc. that's pretty hard, probably close to what these sears/trigger parts are. In fact the EDM shop that makes the sears, etc for Timey, is the same shop I had make close tolerance parts/dies. Timey is in San Marcos Tx. I should visit with them. BTW I do feel better with some type of lube, and it does make the OEM trigger assembly slicker, feels like you set the poundage down some. One of my varmit rifle trigger feels as good 1yr later as I just lubed it yesterday. You seem very knowledgeable. I enjoy conversing with you, just be carful using the word Professional. Most of the people that claim to be "Experts or Professionals" are usually full of them selves.

  9. #8
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    I flush my Walker style trigger with lighter fluid from time to time. Seems to work okay.

  10. #9
    Senior Member Deadshot2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kawzak View Post
    I don't remember saying the lube sealed anything though.
    I don't recall saying you did. I merely mentioned it because it's just one of the purposes of "lube". It separates metal to prevent friction. It cools the lubricated surfaces if it's a liquid lube that is circulated. It prevents wear (either by separation or by depositing anti-wear/anti-welding agents). Lastly, in the case of greases one of their purposes is to seal the bearing surfaces from the entrance of wear inducing particles or liquid.

    FWIW, I actually was a Lube Professional. I was employed by one of the largest Oil Companies on the West Coast and in addition to my College training I was further trained in their products. When a Customer need some expert advice I was one of those that provided it to them.

    One thing to remember, while a little lube makes you feel better, even though the surfaces are hardened to extreme levels, it also makes all kinds of dirt and grit "feel better too". These annoying little particles now have a place that they can stick. Once a few find their way into the goo, they send out messengers to invite their friends. Eventually they get things nice and gummed up. .

    Like I said, Timney highly recommends that their trigger assemblies be run DRY (No Lube) but what do they know???


    PS: I don't offer this for your benefit because it's apparent that you have your mind made up. I offer it for the "newbies" out there that are looking for information and for them, I suggest that they follow the recommendations of the trigger manufacturer.

  11. #10
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    I E-mailed Timney about their triggers and or any lube. They responded back about the trigger I was interested in purchasing. They would not respond to any lube or not. No matter though. Interesting, Rem oil is basically kerosene, and not much of a lubricant that they recommend for their firearms. Thanks for your input though. I am not a "Lubrication professional" as you. However having to design and build special one-off machinery and robotics, small multi-function equipment in which I have (4) patents on, many with parts hardeded to +60 Rc-and I designed to utilize lubrication-although very small. Of course these run 24/7 with minimal maint. unlike a trigger parts that moves maybe a few thousanths. I still will not run parts that rub or contact each other "dry", and see no point. Even in a dusty environment. There are dry lubricants that attract no dust/dirt and do not gum up/accumulate ( and specify so). I have had no problems in over 45 yrs with any firearm. I will say that using a straight petroleum "grease" would be bad, as it could freeze/harded in cold weather, and would attract dust-agree. Anyway- I agree it's OK to disagree.


 
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