Loctite damage on the receiver...?
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  1. #1
    Junior Member Gun_ee_07's Avatar
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    Loctite damage on the receiver...?

    Hi all

    Am fitting out my Remington 700 XCR Long Range Tactical in 300 WinMag. I will be fitting an EGW Heavy Duty picatinny scope base. I will be using 243 (Blue) Loctite on the screws and applying 20 inch pounds of torque. My dilemma is whether I should apply Loctite to the base of the mount (on account of it being a 300 WinMag) as I am concerned it may damage the TriNyte coating on the receiver. Thoughts?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator rkittine's Avatar
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    Welcome to the Forum Guney. I would only put it on the screws.

    Bob
    Robert Kittine
    Sag Harbor and Manhattan, New York

  3. #3
    Junior Member Gun_ee_07's Avatar
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    Thanks Bob

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  5. #4
    Super Moderator Doom's Avatar
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    Please don’t! I have a bolt on muzzle break and put blue loctite on the barrel. Unfortunately it will be there forever. Haven’t tried loctite solvent but I understand it doesn’t work.
    "If we open a quarrel between the past and the present we shall find that we have lost the future.”
    Winston Churchill

  6. #5
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    Blue loctite is supposed to be workable,I’ve used it and disassembled a few scope mounts, the red loctite is damn near impossible to disassemble,and the Black loctite is forever.

  7. #6
    Super Moderator rkittine's Avatar
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    Most can be loosened with heat, but the problem is how much heat and what other damage do you do. I am not a big Loctite fan.

    Bob
    Robert Kittine
    Sag Harbor and Manhattan, New York

  8. #7
    Junior Member Danmac's Avatar
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    Very very small amount of blue has always worked for me. About a 1/4 of a drop or less.

  9. #8
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    Loctite has a “Purple” and is made to just provide enough resistance and safe removal.
    It’s worth the try to start less and go up if needed. I use it on all my gun screws
    Randy

    700P .308 / Millett LRS
    700P .223 / Millett LRS

  10. #9
    Super Moderator Doom's Avatar
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    If you are really concerned you can bed the rail for solid contacy using JBWeld. I have done this before with rails that didn’t sit firmly on the receiver. Used floor past wax as the release agent if I remember correctly.
    "If we open a quarrel between the past and the present we shall find that we have lost the future.”
    Winston Churchill

  11. #10
    Junior Member Bruce Frank's Avatar
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    Blue Loctite can be removed more easily with a little heat, in the 300 degree F range. A laser thermometer and a propane torch makes it easy for a flat bond between a receiver and a mount base. Or just heat testing the strength every few seconds, heating , testing, heating, until it comes loose. If working on a screw you will find that the trigger type soldering gun will usually do the job. Place the tip of the soldering iron on the screw head, pull the trigger and hold it tightly against the head for about a minute. The test it with the driver or Allen wrench. If the first try doesn't work, continue with a longer heating with the iron. The heat is not enough to hurt the screw or any other metal or bluing. Other coatings may be susceptible, but the screw through a base is not going to get hot enough to cause any damage to the gunmetal. If the gun is coated with a finish, test a spot out of sight under the stock, grip, or hand-guard. Most finishes will handle 300+ degrees F as a barrel under sustained fire can get hotter than that.


 
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