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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's my dad's 1978 Remington 700 in .243. It's got a nice stock with checkering and a Monte Carlo cheekpiece, no faux ebony fore-end. It's got a 4x Bushnell Sportview scope on it. DQ marking on the other side tells me it was made in 1978. The safety holds the bolt in place, so it seems to be the pre-lawsuits trigger haha. It's a crisp 6 or 7 pound trigger pull.

I'm batting around the idea of rebarreling it in .260 and turn it in to a Hunter Class Silhouette rifle, keeping the stock the same, just changing the barrel and the scope. It sits in my safe doing nothing since I don't go hunting. I think it would be cool to bring my dad out to see me knock down rams at 500 meters with his rifle.The stock and cheek piece fit me nicely so it's an appealing idea.


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At what distances do you want to shoot metal targets? Why not bed the action, float the barrel, change the trigger out and put a more powerful scope on it and see how it shoots before spending the money for a new barrel, chambering and installing. The .243 can be pretty accurate, especially if you hand load for it.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
With this gun I'm just there to have fun and dip my toe in to the High Power version of silhouette, so I think your suggestion Bob is probably best.
I'd be shooting at 500 meters maximum, down to 200 meters. It seems that the 90/85 grain bullets that the 1-10 twist will allow for aren't quite heavy enough to knock down rams at 500. But I'm not going to be setting any records or competing for match winner anytime soon anyways.
I have a rifle that can be very competitive for smallbore silhouette, I can work on my technique there for less money anyways.
Doing those first few changes of bedding, free floating, changing the trigger and getting a scope on it should definitely be my first priority.
 

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Your ADL is a "Dupont" 700, take that .243 barrel to the bench any day. The ballistics on .243 is so close to the .260 won't know the difference plus .243 ammo/components much easier to obtain. Spend the money on Bob's suggestions and I'll add drop 700 barrel/action into a glass stock with some weight to steady the rifle for those 500 yard plates.

You should be able to spin heavier bullets with the 1/10 twist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Your ADL is a "Dupont" 700, take that .243 barrel to the bench any day. The ballistics on .243 is so close to the .260 won't know the difference plus .243 ammo/components much easier to obtain. Spend the money on Bob's suggestions and I'll add drop 700 barrel/action into a glass stock with some weight to steady the rifle for those 500 yard plates.

You should be able to spin heavier bullets with the 1/10 twist.
That's all I needed to hear. Gave me some confidence in it. I just hope the barrel is still in good condition, sadly my dad just had it sitting under the bed in a case for most of its life. Took it out for sighting and very sporadic hunting trips. He just wasn't a gun enthusiast. He appreciates what I can do now with a rifle though.

If the bore looks ok I'm just going to have a smith bed, float, and install a 2 stage trigger. I've got Leupold 6.5-20 EFR that's ready to roll on this bad boy. I know my dad will be proud to see this thing shooting and performing.

I've got a bunch of pistol components to sell off that can pay for all of this.
 

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I won't worry about a two stage trigger, but get a Timney, preferably a CE "Calvin Elite". In the past I have even hollowed out the forend and put no. 9 shot and epoxy in for added weight.
 

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If the 700 been in a case most of its life just give it a real good cleaning to swab out any old copper then point a flashlight from the chamber to view the lands as it should be shiny.

As Bob posted, save yourself some money and add the Timney trigger over a 2 stage. I added a Timney to my 700 M40 style HB set the # to 3 LBS works like a charm. You receive instructions, can do it yourself, just knock out 2 pins and install then set the weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If the 700 been in a case most of its life just give it a real good cleaning to swab out any old copper then point a flashlight from the chamber to view the lands as it should be shiny.

As Bob posted, save yourself some money and add the Timney trigger over a 2 stage. I added a Timney to my 700 M40 style HB set the # to 3 LBS works like a charm. You receive instructions, can do it yourself, just knock out 2 pins and install then set the weight.
Why the preference for the Calvin Elite over the two-stage? Timney offers a 2-stage full adjustable trigger, better price too, Calvin Elite for Rem 700 is $250 vs the Timney 2-stage options at $210 and $220.
I run a two-stage trigger in my smallbore rifle and in my AR Service Rifle, so I'm just comfortable with the platform.
Interested to hear what the benefits of the Timney Calvin Elite are over a Timney 2-stage, especially since the price difference is negligible, $40 difference at most.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I won't worry about a two stage trigger, but get a Timney, preferably a CE "Calvin Elite". In the past I have even hollowed out the forend and put no. 9 shot and epoxy in for added weight.
I'm curious about what the final weight will come out to after bedding and adding a slightly larger scope. I've heard of people adding shot to their fore-ends.

Any recommendations on lightweight scope rings for the silhouette game? I know I'm going to save a few ounces taking off the scope mount bar that currently sits on it. If I can avoid having to use a rail it would save me some ounces.
 

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I use Burris Signature Z Rings for all my builds. Depending on the Caliber 4 screw or 6 screw. The inserts keep the scope from getting ring marks and allow a lot of adjustment in MOA tilt, while holding the scope firm enough for 1,000 yard bench rest shooting.
 

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Got to agree with rkittine about keeping that 243. My first 243 was a Rem 700 that I got in 1970 and put a Leupold 3x9 on it for accurate distant varmint shooting. I could have cried over its lack of accuracy, especially since my wife had a Mossberg 880 that cost me $50 and a $30 Bushnell 3x9. The Mossberg did not care what kind of ammo she fed it, factory or hand loads, 100gr, 85gr, or 75gr bullets, separately or all together. It put every bullet in the same hole at 100 yards. In a gun magazine there was an article revealing that Remington might have a problem with a stock duplicator that did not always place the pressure bump in the right spot (6 o'clock) under the barrel.. Sure enough, mine was about the 4 o'clock position. Free floating the barrel made a big difference in the accuracy. Using 75 or 85 grain bullets in hand loads made any crow within 300 to 400 yards guaranteed to die. Wish that I had never been talked into trading that 243 but I have acquired an ancient 788 that almost does a good a job.
 
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