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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've only shot this a few times, less than 100 rounds. I've had it for a few years, just didn't shoot it much. Now I am getting ready to hunt, and it won't fire a round...just leaves a soft indent on the primer. I've tried different ammo, same result. Any ideas? Thanks in advance!
 

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You need to disassemble the bolt and clean the firing pin assembly. It's probably a dried grease and maybe some carbon. There are Youtube videos that show how to do it and what to look for.
 

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By all means clean out the inside of the bolt and when re-installing firing pin assy, check it for firing pin protrusion. When de-cocked the pin should protrude .055" and if it doesn't look for particles of powder, brass, or dried grease at the far end of the bolt tube, just before the firing pin channel itself. There's a shoulder that the firing pin hits when it's fully forward and you'd be amazed at what can build up on it over time. Every once in a while I have to take a flat bladed screw driver I've ground so it fits inside, with sides parallel and not tapered, and scrape the buildup off this shoulder. Of course I shoot a lot and have to maintain more than most.

One other area to check is that the bolt handle is fully down when closed. Any foreign material in the locking lug area or under the handle either in action slot or stock, can hold the handle up just enough that the firing pin cocking piece doesn't allow it to move fully forward. This happened to me a couple times and it's in an area that can easily be overlooked. It doesn't take much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the additional input, Deadshot2. I cleaned out the bolt and firing pin yesterday. I think I might have used too much Rem Oil on it as I was able to get some stuff off. I will try to get out shooting either tomorrow or Monday. Here's to hoping it is fixed. I appreciate all the input. I always know my firearm better when something fails ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
i cleaned up the rifle like suggested, chambered the first round, and heard that beautiful sound of a 30.06! Estactic, and relieved, I chambered the next round....dud. Dud. Dud.
Pulled the bolt. Looked at it (kind of like when your call won't start and you pop the hood and look around, but have no clue what you are looking for or at!). Put bolt back in, loaded completely different rounds from a different manufacturer, chambered, sighted, pulled the trigger....WHAM! Another round down range. Whew!! Chambered the next round...dud. dud. dud. Put the rifle back in the truck and had fun with the shotgun and AR.
 

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Is the ammo surplus ammo? Or off the shelf? If the firing pin assembly and the hole it rides in are clean you might need a new spring. From what I have read some years had crappy springs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
using Remington and Winchester. First 70 rounds or so were never a problem. Then after sitting for 4-5 months it wouldn't fire at all. I am going to give it one more good cleaning and try again. I'll make sure it isn't over oiled. Just weird. If it doesn't work again, I'll look into the spring. Thanks! Gotta convince the wife that I "need" to go back up to the mountain tomorrow ;-)
 

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Just to make sure, have you de-cocked the firing pin with the bolt removed. After re-assembling the bolt, just turn the cocking piece so the firing pin is released. Then check the protrusion of the firing pin where it sticks out of the bolt face. It should stick out about the same as the thickness of a dime. (dime =.050" F/P protrusion =.052")

If this isn't happening then you have a firing pin problem, either an obstruction in the bolt where the firing pin hits when fully forward, a weak or broken spring, or something on the cocking piece that's preventing the pin from going fully forward. Check the base of the ramp on the bolt body where the cocking piece rests after fired. There should be a clear gap when the firing pin is in the fired position.
 

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Since it fires (albeit occasionally) then firing pin protrusion must be okay (at times). When it misfires, OP reports a small light dent on the primer. So either the firing pin tip is damaged, or the firing pin spring is hanging up inside the bolt body at times. If the firing pin wasn't making it thru the bolt head to strike the primer, then the light dents wouldn't occur on misfires. I would disassemble the bolt to parade-rest, clean and inspect all of the parts, and make sure it is re-assembled properly by the owner's manual. Certain parts may be out of proper orientation or there may be a manufacturing burr that the firing spring is hanging up on "sometimes". The firing pin tip looks like it may have a proper orientation to it (up/down), so you can try reversing that to see if one way works better.
 

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Since it fires (albeit occasionally) then firing pin protrusion must be okay (at times). When it misfires, OP reports a small light dent on the primer. So either the firing pin tip is damaged, or the firing pin spring is hanging up inside the bolt body at times. If the firing pin wasn't making it thru the bolt head to strike the primer, then the light dents wouldn't occur on misfires. I would disassemble the bolt to parade-rest, clean and inspect all of the parts, and make sure it is re-assembled properly by the owner's manual. Certain parts may be out of proper orientation or there may be a manufacturing burr that the firing spring is hanging up on "sometimes". The firing pin tip looks like it may have a proper orientation to it (up/down), so you can try reversing that to see if one way works better.
Yes, I agree that firing pin protrusion is PROBABLY OK but not all the time. As for firing pin springs hanging up inside the body, rarely have I seen that. I have seen pieces of "crud" floating around that get caught between the shoulder on the front of the firing pin and the shoulder in the bolt body that controls the protrusion. Also crud that blocks the cocking piece (as I said before). The spring is easy to diagnose. If it's not broken and you can barely pull one end back from either end with your fingers, it's strong enough.

Every Remington owner should own a Menck tool so they can easily disassemble the firing pin assembly for a good annual cleaning and checkup.

http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-t...-ruger-bolt-tool-sku590007000-8868-21976.aspx

A good investment of $28.


One other thing I'd be interested in and that's the "Headspace" measurement on both the cartridges that failed to fire and also on a few fired cases. I have seen bucket loads of cases that have had their shoulders set too far back that won't fire when forced to headspace off the extractor. The ejector spring pushes the case into the shoulder and the extractor has enough clearance to cause a light strike even with full firing pin protrusion.

Another area is the primer and how deep it's seated. Some people get a little ambitious when uniforming primer pockets with cheap tools. The primer is recessed too far into the case and same problem, firing pin can't reach the primer with enough force.

Repeating an earlier possibility, make sure that the bolt isn't stopping the cocking piece from freely moving forward when firing. With NO CARTRIDGE IN THE CHAMBER, close the bolt and while carefully watching the bolt handle, pull the trigger. Does the bolt handle jump up or down? If so this means that the cocking piece is hitting the bolt body. Many Remington bolts are so poorly times that the handle can travel too far "down" which then causes the cocking piece to strike the ramp which cushions it's impact on the primer. Ideally the bolt handle won't move at all when the pin drops. Lastly, be sure and clean the locking lug area in the front of the action. There could be a piece of carbon, some powder, or part of a cleaning patch that's keeping the bolt from locking fully. It's an area that's a bugger to see into without a borescope that allows you to look into the hidden corners. Without a borescope you can bend a piece of coathanger wire or welding rod and probe the hidden areas. You can tell the difference by feel between bare metal and "crud".
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Took the rifle out today. I took the bolt apart this weekend and gave it one more good cleaning. Got some more "stuff" off. I think i might not have wiped it down enough after the last cleaning and over oiled it.

First round took off downrange like a champ. Round 2 decided to stay in the chamber. Pulled the bolt out for inspection....looked fine. Replaced bolt and fired the next three rounds no problem.

Encouraged, I chambered 5 more rounds. Round one left me with that fantastic sound that we all love. Round 2 left me with "click". Pulled the bolt and saw...well, nothing. A little "brassy" on the extractor, but that's it. Next three rounds fired fine.

Decided to practice with my carry piece for a few clips, and then back to the rifle. Fired flawlessly for the next 10 rounds. More carry practice, then 10 more rounds with the rifle. All went well. All told, today I shot 40 rounds with only the 2 hiccups.

While I am glad that my rifle is firing again, I am left without any real conclusion, other than what I had previously stated with the possibility of leaving too much oil on the firing pin.

I appreciate all the input. It will come in handy, I am sure, when I have an issue sometime in the future. You guys are great.
 

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Took the rifle out today. I took the bolt apart this weekend and gave it one more good cleaning. Got some more "stuff" off. I think i might not have wiped it down enough after the last cleaning and over oiled it.

First round took off downrange like a champ. Round 2 decided to stay in the chamber. Pulled the bolt out for inspection....looked fine. Replaced bolt and fired the next three rounds no problem.

Encouraged, I chambered 5 more rounds. Round one left me with that fantastic sound that we all love. Round 2 left me with "click". Pulled the bolt and saw...well, nothing. A little "brassy" on the extractor, but that's it. Next three rounds fired fine.

Decided to practice with my carry piece for a few clips, and then back to the rifle. Fired flawlessly for the next 10 rounds. More carry practice, then 10 more rounds with the rifle. All went well. All told, today I shot 40 rounds with only the 2 hiccups.

While I am glad that my rifle is firing again, I am left without any real conclusion, other than what I had previously stated with the possibility of leaving too much oil on the firing pin.

I appreciate all the input. It will come in handy, I am sure, when I have an issue sometime in the future. You guys are great.
I don't LEAVE ANY oil on the firing pin. I clean it with solvent and blow it dry. That's it. Unless I "drowned" the rifle and filled the bolt with water, no lube is left. If one insists on putting lube on the firing pin and spring, spray come CLP on it after cleaning and then blow off as much as possible with a good blast of compressed air. That will leave a thin film of CLP that will protect against corrosion if that's your concern. ANY significant amount of lube left behind will act like a hydraulic damper, collect dirt and crud, and cause the problems you've experienced.
 

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OP, did you even get this fully resolved???

I'm having a similar issue with a 700 SPS in .223

***Copied from my other thread***
Randomly, It would click, but no bang... I'd eject the round and see that it was dimpled, but the round had not gone off.

These were all factory, at least two different brands and loads, no reloads...
Box 1, 5 out of 20, Dimple, but no fire
Box 2, 3 out of 20, Dimpled, but no fire
Box 3, 4 out of 20, Dimpled, but no fire
Pulled the bolt, visually inspected it, looked fine, cleaned and lubed it anyway.
Box 4, 3 out of 20, Dimpled, but no fire.

This gun is maybe a year or just over old and has maybe 250-300 rounds though it, including the ones mentioned above...

***

I need to take my bolt apart and inspect and clean it... Something I've never done... I mean I've removed the bolt from the gun, but never disassembled the bolt itself...

I'm hoping this is the issue as I do tend to be a little generous with the lube and could have got too much in it...

Just have to get time to get back in there and then test it out...
 

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I agree, no lube or as little as possible on the firing pin. I spray the inside of the bolt with brake cleaner, put a big patch on a cleaning rod, push it down to the firing pin hole twist it around until it comes out clean.
 
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