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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I finally got to shoot my SPS a bit more (had the rifle for around 2 years now and I only have 80 rounds through it).

I went up to Angeles Shooting Range and I was working my way out from a 100 yard zero all the way up to 600 yards in 100 yard increments.

Im a fairly new shooter when it comes to shooting out past 100 yards. Most of my experience with rifles is with irons on my M1A or AR15's.

I was getting mostly hits out at that range, but of course as soon as the camera was rolling, of course I get one miss out of 3.. Just my luck...

Here's the stick.. Stock .308 700 SPS with Falcon Menace Scope, EGW 20MOA Base, NF Ti Rings. Also sports a Harris Bi-Pod now.


Heres the Vid..
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7DygHNm9XQ

I need to work a bit more on my technique, but I think Im tuning in pretty well so far!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not a bad idea. I also wanted to get into some CMP matches and try my hand at that. I have a M1A NM and a nice 20" AR15 with a good HBAR barrel.

I cant wait to put a proper stock on my SPS though and see how the accuracy will improve. The standard Hogue stock sometimes contacts the barrel and I know it causes some flyers here and there.
 

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SVThuh said:
Not a bad idea. I also wanted to get into some CMP matches and try my hand at that. I have a M1A NM and a nice 20" AR15 with a good HBAR barrel.

I cant wait to put a proper stock on my SPS though and see how the accuracy will improve. The standard Hogue stock sometimes contacts the barrel and I know it causes some flyers here and there.

Yes that Hogue stock really has to go. There are very very few people that really keep them on at all.
 

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SVThuh said:
The standard Hogue stock sometimes contacts the barrel and I know it causes some flyers here and there.

Fairly common happening. Simple cure is to take the action off and open up the barrel channel. I even had to do this with a replacement stock once.

Find a long/deep socket from a socket wrench set that just sits snuggly in the existing channel. Wrap it with some 60 grit sandpaper and work the channel deeper. It won't take much. If you want to check if the barrel will hit after you take 40-50 thousandths out of the barrel channel, get some yellow paint and thin it with some gun oil. Yes, oil, not paint thinner. The oil will keep the bright yellow paint from drying before you can wipe it off.

Put a thin coat of the thinned paint on the bottom and sides of the barrel. Insert the barrel/action in the stock being careful to tighten the action screws without letting the barrel sag and touch the stock. This can be done by placing a shim of cardboard at the front of the stock between it and the barrel.

When tight, remove the shim and then squeeze the barrel and forend together. Give it a fairly good squeeze but don't go to extremes.

Remove the barrel/action from the stock and then look for any yellow paint spots on the stock. Sand them off and repeat the process until you see no more marking from the barrel.

Finish the barrel channel with a light sanding with fine paper and if you want, apply some matte colored paint that closely matches the stock.

This is especially necessary if one uses a bipod as sandbags don't provide as much "leverage" to the stock, especially if they support the firearm farther back on the stock.
 
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