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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
this is technically my first real stab at trying to be accurate (i shot before with a very cheap setup that made me unhappy with the inaccuracy)

heres the rig:
Remington 700 SPS tactical
Bushnell 3200 Elite Tactical 10x40
Burris XTR low rings
weaver extended base
KRG bolt handle kit
UTG bipod (eventually wanna replace this with a higher end one)
factory hogue overmold stock



middle: shots for zeroing in at 100 yards
bottom right: first group (federal gold match)
bottom left: second group (federal gold match)
top left: third group (federal gold match)
top right: fourth group (federal power shok) [i ran out of match ammo so i rushed this group]

they were all 5 shot groups on the bipod with a sock bag at the rear

from just looking at these shots, is there any suggestions on improvement? something im already aware of is i am new to firing higher powered rifles and i did catch myself flinching slightly to prepare for the recoil. i got over this quick, and also i emphasized that i followed through on the trigger pull as best as i can.

just curious also, on the top right target, when i say i rushed, i loaded up 4+1 and shot each round as fast as i could operate the bolt, get a good sight and fire...is it normal that my shots ended up high right? my mistake was i ran out of match ammo and switched over to cheaper ammo, and also decided to change shooting speed, so too many variables were changed.

thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
that makes sense...sorry for the noobness that was pretty much common sense haha, i thought my zero was getting away from me for a sec.
 

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Hi jonjonkills,

I would concentrate on your breathing, use slow steady breath control. Next concentrate on trigger control, a slow steady squeeze is what you want. The rifle should surprise you when it fires. Next would be the quality and adjustment of your trigger. If it has a lot of take up, creep or over travel it should be addressed by a gun smith. If this doesn't rectify the problem, an aftermarket trigger like a Jewell or Timney might be a big help. Do all of these things first, then address your load, starting with a good basic commercially available load like the Federal GM you were using. Learn what it and you can do with your rifle over several range sessions before you switch. Pay attention to how your rifle behaves with a cold barrel and a warm one. Don't evaluate your rifle on windy days until you know what it will do in calm conditions. Once you have fully evaluated your rifle with one commercial ammo, try a different one and shoot your rifle several times at the same range (distance) with the new ammo before making any scope adjustments.
Speaking of scopes, check your current scope. Make sure your mount is solid and adjusted correctly. make sure your scope is tight and cannot move. Make sure that you have no overtightened your rings. Then make sure that your scope is holding zero correctly. I have seen some mighty nice rifles get sold for a song because the scope or mount was not up to par. Don't make the mistake of blaming the rifle for accuracy issues when the scope or mount is at fault.

I think your rifle is shooting very well. Just spend some time on technique and practice.

Just my .02

Kix
 
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