Remington 700 Rifle Forums banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recemtly bought a 700P in .308. I was wondering what kind of trigger is on it? I didn't see anything in the manual. Is it an X Mark Pro? My trigger doesn't have an adjustment screw on it. And is it worth it changing the trigger to a Timney 510 trigger?
Thanks for the responses,
Tim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
600 Posts
If your really lucky you have the 40x, it could be the older Rem trigger (pre x pro mark). Try taking apart the stock and barreled action, on the trigger housing you should see 3 screws. One on the back (same side as rear action screw) and two on the front one above the other. Leave the rear screw alone! The two on the front control over travel and pull weight. The top screw controls over travel and the bottom screw controls the pull weight. They say with these trigger you shouldn't go lighter than 3.5 pounds, if you want lighter than that get a drop in trigger like a Jewell.

The screws may have some a coating on them, once your done adjusting replace the coating with some nail polish or paint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
600 Posts
"Gunsmithing: Rifles" by Patrick Sweeney states;

The Remington trigger. #1 is the over-travel screw. #2 is the weight of pull screw. #3 (Don't touch this one!) is the sear engagement screw.
Screw #3 is the rear screw on the trigger housing

He also mentions the over travel screw shouldn't need much adjusting if any.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
526 Posts
The wonderful thing about the INTERNET is that you can find support for almost any position. :)

I don't know anything about Patrick Sweeney but I can't imagine why a gunsmith would not want to properly adjust a trigger.

Sear engagement is what controls creep and give that nice clean break. Too little engagement and a slight tap on the rifle will cause it to fire.

One of the reasons that Remington changed their triggers was because improper adjustment by home gunsmiths may cause unintentional discharges. Perhaps Mr. Sweeney just didn't want to assume the liability for that. I don't blame him.

It's really not hard to do it correctly but it does take some thought and some ability to understand the workings of the trigger. You also must function check the trigger more than just once to insure it is done right.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top