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I have aways taken cleaning my rifles very carefully. I bought some JB compound yesterday and started using it on a Model 70 in .257 Roberts. I just thought that gun was clean. I have been using the Gunslick Foaming Bore Cleaner, Wipe Out Foaming cleaner, Barnes CR-10, and others. I have been using the JB since yesterday and still have not gotten all of the carbon fouling out! I was shocked to say the least and now my arms hurt from all the scrubbing! Here's what I've been doing.

Run a patch with JB compound several strokes. Run a patch soaked with Hoppe's #9. Run a bronze brush with Hoppe's #9 several strokes. Run a dry patch or two. Restart the process. I changed back to bronze brushes becuse I found the nylon ones weren't stiff enough to get out any fouling.

I never did get all of the carbon out. I finally stopped and started on another gun. Does anyone have any experience with JB? How aggressive is it? Will it clean all of the carbon out down to the bare barrell?

This has definitely made me reevaluate those foaming bore cleaners. I dont think they do as well as the claim.
 

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I use JB all the time. Not every time but often. One of the things you'll find is that you will have a layer of carbon, then a layer of copper then another layer of carbon.

You don't need to use the JB until the patches come out clean because I think that never happens. I think if you took a regular piece of steel, like a knife blade, and rub it with JB it will continue to show black.

JB is a very mild abrasive and you won't hurt your barrel.
 

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You have to think of JB's as a metal polish. It actually removes a bit of metal when you use it. The ammount is very small but it's enough to turn patches black. Using it sort of hand laps the barrel. I try and use it to break in new barrels. Once the barrel is broken in, you really don't need anything this aggressive to remove fouling. Simple copper removers and good ol hoppes #9 will get the barrel clean enough. If you are really concerned about buildup that these cleaners won't remove you can purchase Outers Foul Out system. It removes fouling through electrolosis. I try and do this to all of my guns once a year just to get the stuff out that I can't see or remove with solvents. The advantage of the Outers Foul Out system is that it's non-abrasive so it won't remove any barrel material while cleaning.
 

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I use JB cleaner every once in a while in my handguns, but never in my rifles. According to Mike Rock of Rock Creek Barrrls, it works too well. Remember, this dude not only makes barrels, but also has a degree in metallurgy and also supplies barrels for the US Military sniper rifles. He says that you do want to leave some copper fouling in the barrel to act as a bearing surface for the bullet to travel through. He says without it, it will use the barrel itself as a bearing surface and prematurely wear out a barrel. He recommends just using something like Sweets 16 or something along those lines. So you can take that for what its worth. I feel like he is a expert in his field, so I will listen.
On the other hand, I have not found anything better to use than JB cleaner, with a brass patch, at removing lead fouling from cast bullets out of the forcing cone of a revolver.
If you google " how to properly break in a rifle barrel" , you will find a link to Mike Rock's recommendations and about using JB cleaner.
 
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