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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Two questions…
1. I’m interested in a 700 in 308 caliber. Do these rifles still have trigger issues?
2. I bought a 700/243 about 7 years ago and had the trigger replaced by a Remington approved gunsmith. I’ve read where some are still having problems even after the replacement. Should I be concerned about this and look into what type of trigger it now has?
Thanks
 

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No. It was certain years. But, you should always follow those 4 firearm safety rules.

Their triggers are known to be garbage though, heavy and lots of creep. You could always throw a new trigger in. I received a timney trigger yesterday and had it installed before I could finish my can of Coke, very easy 😂
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. I’ve owned and read good things about the 700s. However; why not just buy a different t brand of rifle instead of replacing the trigger in a new one?
I’m just looking for a short range gun that is affordable, accurate, and dependable.
Suggestions are appreciated.
 

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Thanks. I’ve owned and read good things about the 700s. However; why not just buy a different t brand of rifle instead of replacing the trigger in a new one?
I’m just looking for a short range gun that is affordable, accurate, and dependable.
Suggestions are appreciated.
My rifle isn't new, I've owned it since the 90s. I wanted to buy a new rifle but everything has disgusting looking stocks, I was unimpressed with all the popular rifles, Tikka, bergara, Benelli, Weatherby, ect. They all felt like they weren't worth the asking price.

Instead of buying something I wasn't impressed with, that money was used to upgrade my current rifle. The trigger was the last item I was waiting for, very easy to install.

The 700 has been around for a long time and aftermarket support is huge. Sure, other rifles have nice stock or bolt or trigger, but you're going to pay.

What's the primary purpose of the rifle you're looking for?
 

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700's have two generations of triggers, the Walker Trigger and the XMarkPro that was introduced in about 2006. The Walker issues are detailed in the General 700 section. The XMP trigger was recalled in 2014(?). See the link below. To be honest the trigger is typically replaced with an aftermarket trigger by most dedicated shooters. I had two XMP that I replaced when the recall came out. One was good for target work and one wasn't.

I don't know that RemArms is doing anything with this recall.
 

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Two questions…
1. I’m interested in a 700 in 308 caliber. Do these rifles still have trigger issues?
2. I bought a 700/243 about 7 years ago and had the trigger replaced by a Remington approved gunsmith. I’ve read where some are still having problems even after the replacement. Should I be concerned about this and look into what type of trigger it now has?
Thanks
I will answer your questions together:

You should be concerned about the trigger design in any rifle you by. If new you should be concerned to its design and reputation. If used you should be very suspect as to what may have been done to the trigger. If you intend to modify the trigger then you need to understand the limitations of the trigger. A 3-5 lb adjustable trigger is fine if you intend to use it in that range but if you want a 2 lb trigger then you need a 2 lb trigger, not a bastardized 3 lb trigger.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My rifle isn't new, I've owned it since the 90s. I wanted to buy a new rifle but everything has disgusting looking stocks, I was unimpressed with all the popular rifles, Tikka, bergara, Benelli, Weatherby, ect. They all felt like they weren't worth the asking price.

Instead of buying something I wasn't impressed with, that money was used to upgrade my current rifle. The trigger was the last item I was waiting for, very easy to install.

The 700 has been around for a long time and aftermarket support is huge. Sure, other rifles have nice stock or bolt or trigger, but you're going to pay.

What's the primary purpose of the rifle you're looking for?
My primary purpose would be just some open field hunting and range shooting out to about 400 yards.
I am honesty not all in to customization, etc..
I just need to know that if I buy a new 700, I don’t have to be concerned with the trigger being unsafe and firing without intent. Don’t care much about what the pull on the trigger is.
 

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My primary purpose would be just some open field hunting and range shooting out to about 400 yards.
I am honesty not all in to customization, etc..
I just need to know that if I buy a new 700, I don’t have to be concerned with the trigger being unsafe and firing without intent. Don’t care much about what the pull on the trigger is.
Ohh. Nah, the new ones are so lawyered up, you won't have anything to worry about.

I was never big on customized rifles either, then I had zero-ing problems with this rifle. That's when I decided to convert my ADL to a drop mag, new Bell and Carlson stock, new trigger, planning to brake it too. The 700 is so customizable that anyone can find something they like. Also, they're very easy to work on.

This video series got me turned on to modifying my rifle.
 

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The SPS Tacticals are unfortunately equipped with a Hogue pillar bedded stock that has a flimsy front end. It has very inconsistent contact when loading a bipod or when using a front rest. That stock feels very nice but it is not very consistent. The SPS and ADL rifles are not free floated as indicated by Erik in the video above. I'm not a big Cortina fan but that video is spot on in terms of the lower end rifles.

I don't have a good picture of a group from my SPS Tactical but the one below was a load verification that shot for a backup powder. 3 Shots, SPS Tactical 308 with B&C Light Tactical Stock and Timney 510 trigger.

Rectangle Triangle Wood Floor Font


The group below was shot with a 223 ADL Varmint rifle with a Choate Ultimate Varmint Stock and Timney 510 trigger.

Orange Font Circle Logo Graphics
 

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The SPS Tacticals are unfortunately equipped with a Hogue pillar bedded stock that has a flimsy front end. It has very inconsistent contact when loading a bipod or when using a front rest. That stock feels very nice but it is not very consistent. The SPS and ADL rifles are not free floated as indicated by Erik in the video above. I'm not a big Cortina fan but that video is spot on in terms of the lower end rifles.

I don't have a good picture of a group from my SPS Tactical but the one below was a load verification that shot for a backup powder. 3 Shots, SPS Tactical 308 with B&C Light Tactical Stock and Timney 510 trigger.

View attachment 6098

The group below was shot with a 223 ADL Varmint rifle with a Choate Ultimate Varmint Stock and Timney 510 trigger.

View attachment 6095
Right you are.
The videos definitely shed light on some upgrades.
I know nothing about cortina, anything we should know?
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As a hunting rifle with a slender barrel the support from the stock in a hand held situation is not a problem. When tied to a bipod or front rest the support tends to be different at different times and can move the point of impact. I am a little surprised the BDL wood stock was not free floated!

As for Erik he is a F class shooter sponsored by Lapua I believe and can be very controversial at times. He produces a lot of videos and puts out a lot of information. Unfortunately reloading and accuracy can be a rabbit hole and some of his recommendations take people down paths that just don't matter for the average reloader/shooter using a factory rifle. For instance, if you look at conventional recommendations on seating depth for a bullet depth in 308 for a 168gr Matching you might find the recommendation to be 30 thousands off the lands. Try that in a Remington 308 chamber and only the boat tail of the bullet would be in the case. In a match chamber it's a different story. I'm not saying his information is wrong just that the user needs to consider its application to what they are doing.

By the way, the ADL I referenced earlierr was a Dick's Sporting Goods special bought in 2009 for ~$450. The upgraded stock and trigger added about $350 to the cost between 2009 and 2012.
 

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As a hunting rifle with a slender barrel the support from the stock in a hand held situation is not a problem. When tied to a bipod or front rest the support tends to be different at different times and can move the point of impact. I am a little surprised the BDL wood stock was not free floated!

As for Erik he is a F class shooter sponsored by Lapua I believe and can be very controversial at times. He produces a lot of videos and puts out a lot of information. Unfortunately reloading and accuracy can be a rabbit hole and some of his recommendations take people down paths that just don't matter for the average reloader/shooter using a factory rifle. For instance, if you look at conventional recommendations on seating depth for a bullet depth in 308 for a 168gr Matching you might find the recommendation to be 30 thousands off the lands. Try that in a Remington 308 chamber and only the boat tail of the bullet would be in the case. In a match chamber it's a different story. I'm not saying his information is wrong just that the user needs to consider its application to what they are doing.

By the way, the ADL I referenced earlierr was a Dick's Sporting Goods special bought in 2009 for ~$450. The upgraded stock and trigger added about $350 to the cost between 2009 and 2012.
That BDL may have a swivel sticking up, I haven't taken it apart to see.

So, he's basically all high end/precision shooting and some info would translate to hunting rifles? Similar to a race car parts/tunes into a daily driver, sure it will work, but it's not the best idea and your results will actually suffer,?

But, the comparison between the two rifles definitely got my gears turning. Definitely not looking to poke 1k yds, comfortable to 500 would make me happy.
 

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So, he's basically all high end/precision shooting and some info would translate to hunting rifles?
Shooting to 1000 yds with a heavy barreled rifle with custom action and barrel with custom chambers, and custom stock, trying to shoot sub .25 MOA groups against maybe the top 1% of the shooters in the world requires everything to be very precise. In general these are rifles that have inharent accuracies of < 0.2 MOA. Most factory rifles are more on the order 0.5 to 1 MOA. A lot of the finer things that an F class shooter and reloader does is not going to show up in factory rifles. Things like primer pocket uniforming, weighing bullets, meplat uniforming, single digit standard deviation just doesn't produce enough effect to be warranted. Certainly not in a typical hunting rifle or 400yd plinker. For the other 99% of us trigger time is much more important to accuracy than these finer points of reloading. For instance, if I'm shooting a 0.5 MOA rifle with a 308 Match load at 2500 fps that has a standard deviation of 20fps at 400 yds and I reduce the standard deviation to 10 fps the point of impact will move about 0.1 MOA or 0.4". Given the other factors that affect precision the difference due to standard deviation will be hard to determine at that range.

We've come a long way way from triggers on Remington rifles to discussing Erik Cortina. I want to make it clear that I think Erik is a great shooter and also very knowledgable. He is entertaining and maybe a little bit of a smart_ss (makes for good entertainment)! My issue with him is not so much his message or process but in how it is received and implemented by his audience.
 
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Way over my head. Don’t care much about all that high end, specialized BS. Just want to know if a Remington 700/308 outta the box is gonna kill
Someone due to unintentional firing.
I tried to give you the information to make an informed decision on the old Remington triggers and on triggers in general. Triggers and safety's are mechanical devices and as such they can and will fail. I work as an RSO and am certified by as one by the NRA. On a given day on the range I can tell you that I do not look at a trigger to determine whether or not I think it is safe nor do I look to see if a rifle is on "Safe", Make no mistake, I will remove afirearm from the range if it is faulty. However, we rely on safe gun handling to prevent serious accidents when and if a firearm malfunctions. The following link to the NRA rules for safe gun handling will prevent the type of accident you describe regardless of the trigger/safety.


Other shooting organizations have there own rules and in most cases follow these guidelines.
 
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