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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here in Huntsville, AL, our company has hired two Remington employees away from the local plant. In talking with them about my upcoming R700 SPS Tactical build, thread here: https://www.700rifle.com/forum/23-sps-tactical/18561-r700-sps-tactical-build-6-5-creedmoor.html they asked me if I had ever considered a Model 783... obviously not, as the 783 was touted as an entry level bolt gun, I just dismissed it like I do the Savage Axis & Ruger American rifles. But these two former Remington employees asked that I needed to take a closer look at the 783...

The most interesting highlights from conversation with them is quality of the build; heavy steel receiver, smooth floating head bolt w/ tactical bolt knob, nice "accustyle-trigger"; accurate heavy barrel (16.5", 24" & 26" lengths)... other than the lack of after-market support, these two engineers have given the platform high praise.

I found and article that said the 783 makes for a perfect donor platform for a PRS build: Remington 783 ? The Best Donor for PRS/Mag Fed Rifles? | Mystic Precision

So a little research, I can pick one of the 24" heavy barrel rifles in 6.5 CM for about $375 - $397! There are even a couple chassis available from MDT and Oryx for $400. For a stock option you can couple together a Boyds flavor and PT&G bottom metal furniture to run AICS mags.

The fact that you can replace barrels with ease really peeks my interest in this platform...

Thoughts?
 

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There is nothing wrong with a 783, but there is so much more available for a 700 and with its pedigree, the resale value would be better. I have seen some nice builds on the 721 and even rifles built on the XP-100 action, but I stick with 700s and Custom 700 Clones. You can pick up a 700 on sale for $400 from time to time, which is less than the cost of buying the action. That all being said, for a custom build I buy custom actions, because by the time you take a factor action and have it blue printed, you almost have the cost of a Borden, BAT or other custom action.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Since my Rem 700 barreled action project has arrived at my FFL I will sideline this idea for a bit... But a 783 24" heavy barrel (6.5 CM) in an Oryx chassis might be a fun project. But yes, you are correct, the 700 has far more aftermarket support, one of the many reasons have gone back to a short action (have Long Action in 30-06), there are so many options and flavors of most anything R700...

A note here, one of the 'play option' calibers I considered for the 783 was the 223. A rather boring round to shoot, but would make a nice trainer/plinker target rifle.
 

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On a windless day the .223 will surprise you as to what it can do in a custom rifle out to 1,000 yards.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So 2 tipping points for me today; 1: XLR has the Element chassis inlet for the Rem 783 & 2: I found a 6.5 Creedmoor for $388 (+$10 S&H)

I talked at length with one of the EX Remington engineers again, who happens to have built a 783 in 6.5CM, and I believe the rifle to have good potential at competing in PRS or NRL matches. He says the rifle is far easier to work on, the factory barrels are decent (and easily replaceable if not), the trigger is far better than the X-Mark found on the 700; the actions are stronger... The price says go for it!

I purchased a 783 this morning, model #85773, which should be here sometime next week. I will probably move some military surplus rifles out of the stable to generate capital to fund this build, which should be fun. The 85773 is the 24" heavy barrel 783, complete with "tactical" large-style bolt knob. Comes with a cheap-O plastic stock, and a 4 +1 magazine. As the build progress' the stock and magazine will give way to either an XLR Element chassis (1st choice), or an Oryx chassis (not my 1st choice) and some AICS style P-Mags. There are options for stocks from Boyds, but I'm not sure I am up for pillar and skim coat bedding just yet...+ inletting for M5 bottom metal etc etc

To help support the build, I will pick a Savage action wrench, and a set of go/no-go gauges... Looks like fun ahead. If not, well lets just say I have spent more and got less...
 

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I built a 783 in 6.5 Creedmoor several years ago with a 26” Shilen #6 contour 1/8 twist barrel and it is a shooter for sure. Very hard to work up THE load for because it shoots everything good. I put mine in a Boyd’s stock but still have to deal with that plastic trigger gaurd. The bolt on the 783 is much easier to operate than any of my other rifles (R700, Howa 1500, and Savages). The heavy tubular action makes them very strong and accurate. It was my first try and chambering and threading a barrel so I shoulder threaded it without the nut. If you like to tinker, it’s as user friendly as the Savage. The bolt heads on the 783’s is deeper than a Savage but the Savage barrels will work if you have some of rear of the barrel faced off. If not, the barrel will hit the bolt head before proper headspace is achieved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I built a 783 in 6.5 Creedmoor several years ago with a 26” Shilen #6 contour 1/8 twist barrel and it is a shooter for sure. Very hard to work up THE load for because it shoots everything good. I put mine in a Boyd’s stock but still have to deal with that plastic trigger gaurd. The bolt on the 783 is much easier to operate than any of my other rifles (R700, Howa 1500, and Savages). The heavy tubular action makes them very strong and accurate. It was my first try and chambering and threading a barrel so I shoulder threaded it without the nut. If you like to tinker, it’s as user friendly as the Savage. The bolt heads on the 783’s is deeper than a Savage but the Savage barrels will work if you have some of rear of the barrel faced off. If not, the barrel will hit the bolt head before proper headspace is achieved.
Here is 1 of my first 5 shot groups @ 100 yds with it in the modified plastic stock. This without any load development at all.
Thank you for sharing, definitely gives me hope in the right direction. I should get my rifle from the FFL today or tomorrow. Undecided on a stock as yet; from a budget standpoint, it is either a Boyds stock, or an Oryx for a chassis. I reached out to Choate, as their stocks hover around the $220 mark, but they told me that there is just not enough 783's "out there" to warrant the R&D effort...

I'm building a Rem 700 SPS AAC-SD at the same time, so I am sharing a budget, with the R700 reaping more of the benefits... but only slightly.

Thanks for sharing! Need more pics of the completed rifle if you have them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Took half day from work to meet with my FFL so that I could take transfer of the M783 today. I have not had a chance to really absorb all of the details yet, but I like what I am seeing so far. First off, the stock, albeit a hunting style of stock, is really the weakest link. I knew this going in to the project, so no love lost for $388.

1: The bolt is the smoothest and easiest opening Remington bolt I have felt, almost effortless in operation. The oversized bolt knob is a nice touch, and its size and positioning are excellent for someone who might like to grip and rip their bolt (I call it bolt raping).

2: The maching is very clean, no marks like you might find of the Ruger Precision Rifle.

3: The barrel is a heavy barrel, but not a Varmint profile by any means, a hunter would have no problem hauling this rifle around in the wood. The crown is recessed, and unlike my M700, the threaded muzzle cap actually extends slightly beyond the crown to give the recessed crown even more protection. The barrel is stamped Made in Huntsville, AL, which I really like, as I make my living in Huntsville, and have for more than 40-years.

4: The trigger is nice, heavy, but really nice. I will definitely adjust the pull weight down a bit. This is one of the features that the Ex-Remington Engineers say really works on this Remington made trigger. I do not know if this is a copy of the Savage trigger, the engineer stated that it was originally a Marlin trigger, that was possibly a copy of the Savage trigger... he say, that the trigger is much better... we will see. Since there are no aftermarket triggers available for the M783, then it is what it is; polsih adjust and go!

5: Along with the stock, the picatinny rail will go in the discard pile; I believe it is a zero MOA EGW copy. I plan on getting a Weaver 20 MOA base later on in the build.

6: The magazine is a win! Very sturdy and all metal except for the base cap that has the Remington logo on it. Spare magazine are readily available for $25 ea. should I decide to go with a Boyds stock and stick with the factory mag capacity configuration.

This is what I was able to get from the rifle after I pulled it from the box, looked it over, and then locked it in the safe. I will get pics of the rifle sometime tomorrow and post them up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Here are some images of what I feel are the good talking points on the M783:

Like any rifle, the action is machined from a solid piece of steel bar stock, only the bare bone essentials are machined in... even the engraiving has been replaced laser etching:



The shallow slot helps to add to the over-all strength of the receiver... not sure if that is ever an issue with other actions, but it can't hurt. The slot is also long enough at 3" to allow for longer case over all length (C.O.A.L.) increases. Of course the throat of the barrel has yet to be visited to know just how long I can load off the lands.



Barrel nut and recoild plate ala Savage, and anyone else who may have picked up on this feature... Headspace adjustments and barrel replacement just became and evening of customizing for me in the future.



Made in right here is Huntsville, AL:



As discussed, double recessed barrel crown:



A feature that the R700 does not have, is the ridge missing behind the threads of the muzzle. I have a nice muzzle brake that threads all the way to the shoulder of the barrel, and this same brake will not fit on my R700 SPS build (other on-going thread), as there is a ridge at the should that will not let the brake seat...



The trigger is really nice, the blade itself is wide and ever so slightly curved; the safety blade of the trigger has enough resistance to it, it feels like the first stage of a two-stage trigger. Also, the bolt release (black bar at the bottom side of the triger in this image) is moved to the left side of the receiver... very nice feature in my opinion. The trigger pull weight adjustement is in the front of the trigger, as indictaed by the locking nut.



The bolt is probably one of my favorite features of this barreled action; the bolt lift is so effortless and smooth, the over-size bolt lift is sweet! I do not have any ammo test the full operation, but I really love the design!



Finally, the metal magazine; I will have to walk back my comment that the only non-metal item was the base, as the follower is injection molded ABS... not a biggie. If I do not decide to convert this action to accept AICS pattern magazines, that I will run these factory magaizes, as they are real nice. The plan as of right now, is the get a chassis that will accept the AICS mags...

 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Ordered a Leupold 20 MOA base for the M783. It will sit kind of high in the saddle... not many options out there for the M783, and I do not care much for the look of the EGW... Leupold to the rescue!
 

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Be sure to clean it real well. All over and inside. I never shot mine with the factory barrel but I’ve heard they shoot really good. I think, and it’s just a theory, that the heavy action is not affected by the bedding as much. I couldn’t tell any difference in accuracy between the factory plastic stock and the Boyd’s laminated stock. I’ve heard to use lighter fluid to clean the trigger assembly and that’s what I use to clean the whole thing. Have to apply lube after but not the trigger. I’d like to find one of the walnut pull offs to try on mine. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you for the tips, I will be sure to apply them to my progress. When I pulled the factory rail, a lot of thread locker came out with it. The barrel also looks a little suspect to have quite a bit of "gunk" in it. A thorough cleaning is next in the process, as I just placed an order for a Boyds stock . I deliberated long and hard on one of two available chassis options, but I could not justify the $600+ bucks...
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
During the pandemic, I did receive my Boyds stock... in record time actually, but I am reluctant to show it, as I was not convinced that this is the path I wanted to go. Since I have not updated, I thought I would show what I ordered; Walnut (standard grade, as that is all there is), laser engraved Dragon )of course), in the Pro Varmint profile, with pillar bedding option:









The action fits loose, as Boyds really machines with loose tolerances... so bedding this action is the next step... However, I may still go with a chassis option, as I not sure I could bed this action properly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
I was looking hard at getting an Oryx chassis, but I cannot bring myself to pay that for a no frills chassis... The reviews on the chassis are sort of all over the place. For mow I will continue with the Boyd's Walnut stock I purchased.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Made a couple upgrade purchases this past weekend for my 783; I order the Timney trigger upgrade, the PT&G bottom metal upgrade, as well as the PT&G bolt head upgrade. The bottom metal replaces the plastic trigger guard with an Aluminum guard, that will accept AICS style mags, and regarding the bolt head upgrade; I briefly toyed with the idea of converting the rifle caliber over to 6 ARC, which PT&G makes a bolt head for... But the costs became astronomical for my budget rifle, so I opted for the standard 308 bolt head, since my rifle is chambered in 6.5 CM
 
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